Caddie-Shack pest control in Central Coast and San Luis Obispo county

"We Gopher The Gophers"
(805) 471-1870

Common Central Coast Pests

The following burrowing pests cause a multitude of problems for San Luis Obispo County homes, businesses and agriculture. The experts at Caddie Shack Pest Control are licensed professionals that can handle any of these problems quickly and affordably. Contact us today for a free consultation!  

Gophers

Gopher - SLO pest problem

Gophers are a never ending problem on the Central Coast. Contrary to popular belief, gophers do not hibernate. Each year, gophers destroy millions of dollars worth of crops, turf, ornamental plants, and trees. Gophers generally live for three years and reproduce in one. In irrigated landscapes, gophers can produce three litters of five to six new gophers. They are herbivorous and feed on a wide variety of vegetation causing extensive damage to gardens and landscapes. In addition, their digging destroys irrigation systems, diverts water from plants, and undermines the soil causing erosion. To minimize gopher damage, early detection is the key.

What to look for: It is easy to identify gopher activity. As gophers create new tunnels, they have to push the excess dirt to the surface. This dirt appears in the form of horseshoe shaped mounds.

Caddie Shack recommended treatments include:

  • Integrated Pest Management Plan
  • Strychnine baited grain
  • Aluminum phosphate
  • Carbon-monoxide

* Application by a certified specialist is required.  

Moles

Mole - SLO pest problem

Moles are the strangest and most difficult pest to control in San Luis Obispo County. Unlike gophers, moles are not classified as rodents. They are insect-eating mammals and quite unusual looking. Moles have cylinder shaped bodies, spade like limbs, velvety short fur, and a slender pointed snout. During spring moles have one litter per year of three to four young. Although moles generally feed on worms, they will feed on roots, bulbs, and plants. The damage caused by moles is mainly from their shallow tunnels and huge dirt mounds. They create shallow tunnels to feed on worms, and these tunnels dislodge plants and cause roots to dry out. Furthermore, the feeder tunnels can destroy the appearance of turf grass.

What to look for: Often, moles are mistaken for gophers because of their mounds. Mole mounds are much different from gopher mounds; they are circular in shape and resemble a volcano.

Caddie Shack recommended treatments include:

  • Integrated Pest Management Plan
  • Talpirid baited worms
  • Aluminum phosphate
  • Carbon-monoxide

* Application by a certified specialist is required.  

Ground Squirrels

Ground squirrel - SLO pest problem

Ground squirrels are a troublesome pest on the Central Coast. Due to the vast acres of open range land and rolling hills, squirrel populations increase rapidly. They reproduce once per year in late winter and early spring producing seven to eight offspring. Within six months, the young resemble adults. Ground squirrels are herbivorous, and their diet changes with the season. In late winter and spring, they feed on green grasses and ornamental plants. As the grasses dry out, ground squirrels switch to grains, nuts, and berries. Ground squirrels cause extensive damage each year to young ornamental plants and gardens. They also destroy irrigation systems, channel water from plants, and undermine the soil causing soil erosion.

What to look for: It is relatively simple to identify ground squirrels, since they forage for food near their burrows. They have brownish grey fur, a semi-bushy tail, and average 12-15 inches in length. Generally, ground squirrels never go further than seventy-five feet from their burrow that they use for shelter and protection.

Caddie Shack recommended treatments include:

  • Integrated Pest Management Plan
  • Aluminum phosphate
  • Carbon-monoxide

* Application by a certified specialist is required.  

Voles

Vole - SLO pest problem

Voles, also known as meadow mice, are the hardest pest in San Luis Obispo to control. Due to all the open range land and the increased rain, vole populations have exploded. Voles are mice like rodents that look similar to gophers; they are five to eight inches long, grayish to dark brown in color, and have a short fur lined tail. Voles are active year round in the day or night. They are herbivorous feeding on grasses, ornamental plants, and vegetables. Voles reach maturity in 35-45 days and generally live for one year. They are quite prolific. One female can reproduce five to ten times per year with three to six young. Voles cause considerable damage to landscapes and gardens.

What to look for: Voles can be easily detected by clear cut runways in grass and multiple one to two inch burrow openings.

Caddie Shack recommended treatments include:

  • Integrated Pest Management Plan
  • Carbon-monoxide

* Application by a certified specialist is required.